hr law

Egg-Freezing: Will It Help Women at Work?


Egg-Freezing: Will It Help Women at Work?

Apple, Facebook, and other employers have often struggled to recruit and retain female employees in a male-dominated industry. Recently, these companies – as well as others including law and financial services firms – have been adding new employee benefits to attract high-quality, professional women to keep on their payroll.

One of the newest benefits offered is cryo-preservation, also known as egg-freezing. Some believe this new benefit is great for women who want to have a career and delay raising children, and for those women who have not yet found the right partner with whom to start a family. Others see this “benefit” as another way of forcing women to choose career over family, insinuating that women cannot have both a career and family simultaneously.

In my article titled “Egg-Freezing: Is it Truly an Employee Benefit,” co-author Claudia Castillo and I examine some of the social, economic, and legal issues surrounding this new employee benefit. We encourage you to read the article published in the Contra Costa Lawyer magazine and add your own comments to the conversation.

LinkedIn Contacts: To Whom Do They Belong?


LinkedIn Contacts: To Whom Do They Belong?

Do you voluntarily use LinkedIn to help your employer promote business, services and/or products? Does your company request, or require employees to use LinkedIn to further develop client/customer/vendor relationships?

What happens if/when the employment relationship ends on a sour note? Will there be a battle between employer and employee regarding the ownership of the LinkedIn contacts, and perhaps the account(s) used?

In my November 2014 post titled “Employer vs. Employee: Ownership of LinkedIn Contacts” I explored these questions and others that employers and employees may face when the employment relationship ends and ownership of LinkedIn information becomes disputed. While courts have yet to publish many decisions on this issue, I focused on a federal court case (Eagle v. Morgan) that provides some guidance to employers.

I also added four tips for employers to prevent such disputes from arising and to help employers maintain control and ownership of LinkedIn information former employees have used/developed on their employer’s behalf.

September 30, 2014: NCERT Seminar On Workplace Investigations


September 30, 2014: NCERT Seminar On Workplace Investigations

How employers investigate and resolve employee complaints of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and other misconduct can have a serious impact on liability, workplace morale, productivity and culture. I am proud to announce that the Northern California Employment Round Table (NCERT) has scheduled a top-notch presentation titled “Responding to Employee Complaints: From Investigation to Resolution.” This presentation will be held on September 30, 2014 from 8:30-10:30a.m. at the County of Alameda Administration Building in Oakland, CA.

As President of NCERT, I have the honor of welcoming all attendees and introducing our distinguished panel comprised of:

Human Resources professionals, attorneys, business owners and executives should not miss this event. For further details and registration information, please refer to this flyer. I look forward to seeing you there!

Another Government Agency Addresses Social Media in the Workplace


Another Government Agency Addresses Social Media in the Workplace

In my latest post for Maximize Social Business, I summarize and analyze the impact of the public meeting and the issues that the EEOC highlighted. Ultimately, it is refreshing to know that most of the issues brought before the EEOC are ones that I have written about (and counseled my clients on) over the past several years. The EEOC’s interest in these issues, however, should serve as a reminder to employers that social media in the workplace will only raise more issues and pose more risks unless employers are proactive and avoid waiting for the EEOC to come knocking on the door.

Employee and Employer Liability For Causing Car Crash By Sending A Text


Employee and Employer Liability For Causing Car Crash By Sending A Text

Do you have any employer liability If your employee texts while driving?

Did you know you could be held liable for sending a text that results in a car crash? Typically, victims of car accidents blame the other driver who may have been driving while texting. One Court recently held, however, that even a remote texter could be held liable if the recipient of the text causes an accident.

In my most recent article titled “Beware a New Way Employers and Employees Could Be Liable for Texting on the Job” for Maximize Social Business I analyze that decision and how it may apply to employers and employees who text and/or receive texts on the job.

My article has unexpectedly generated quite a bit of interest. It was chosen as a Top Blog post by CommPRO.biz, and I have received requests for interviews by a CBS radio affiliate. There certainly will be more developments in this area of the law as Courts try to catch up with technology.