Pitfalls To Avoid With Employee Advocacy


Pitfalls To Avoid With Employee Advocacy

Employee advocacy” is a hot topic among marketers and PR folks these days. This focus on using employees to spread a company’s message via social media is an exciting and seemingly perfect fit for many companies. Simply, why shouldn’t a company harness the power of a faithful workforce? Unfortunately, there are many legal issues that should be examined before any company turns employees loose on social media.

In my post titled “5 Employment Law Considerations For Employee Advocacy” for Maximize Social Business, I examine some of the legal pitfalls to be avoided regarding employee advocacy. Let me know what further pitfalls your company has faced and/or has already addressed? Does your company embrace employee advocacy?

Two Worlds Have Collided


Two Worlds Have Collided

As many of you know, I have been fortunate to be an active member of the Contra Costa County Bar Association and have served on the Board of Directors for several years. The Bar Association is one of the great professional organizations to which I belong and contribute in connection with my “day job.”

When I am not involved with the CCCBA, or providing legal services to clients, I try to enjoy family time and giving back to the community in additional ways. This past year, I had the privilege of serving as the President of Walnut Creek Little League. It was an honor to be President and to have worked with other community volunteers during the 75th anniversary of Little League, the 40th anniversary of Softball Little League, and the 25th anniversary of Little League’s Challenger Division. Coincidentally, this year was also Walnut Creek’s 100th birthday. This past season, WCLL served a record number of players (almost 900) ranging from ages 5-14 years old.

These two worlds collided in the August 2014 edition of the Contra Costa Lawyer magazine. The entire edition of the magazine was devoted to the “secret lives” of legal professionals in Contra Costa County. Nicole Mills (a wonderful legal professional and mother of two WCLL players) exposed to the local legal community my secret life as WCLL President. Thank you Nicole for a flattering article, and for helping to expose the far more interesting secret lives of other Contra Costa County attorneys and judges.

The Law On Social Media and Employment Is Still Evolving


The Law On Social Media and Employment Is Still Evolving

Social media and technology keep advancing at a rapid pace. The law has furiously been trying to catch up. For a short time, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) was at the forefront of creating the framework for social media and employment law. In June 2014, however, the U.S. Supreme Court stalled, at least temporarily, the NLRB’s efforts to create new guidance.

In my July 2014 post for Maximize Social Business, I briefly analyzed the case of National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning and how the Supreme Court will impact the NLRB’s progress. And, I specifically analyzed how this court decision will impact the landscape of social media and employment law. Only time will tell if the NLRB will catch up with its work before technology moves beyond today’s workplace technologies.

Deleting Your Facebook Posts Could Cost You


Deleting Your Facebook Posts Could Cost You

Deleting Facebook posts may get you in hot water legally.

Most everyone has read about warnings concerning sharing too much information on social media and employees who have posted videos, photos or comments that have resulted in getting “Facebook fired.”

Most folks do not know, however, that deleting social media posts, can, if deleted at certain times, can result in Court sanctions. In my post titled “Former Employee Sanctioned For Deleting Posts on Facebook” for Maximize Social Business, I analyze a recent case from Nevada. Learn why a Court in a sexual harassment case instructed a jury against someone who deleted Facebook posts about her former employer.

Employers: Your Biggest Social Media Risks Identified


Employers: Your Biggest Social Media Risks Identified

Has your business identified your social media risks?

According to a recent world-wide survey, one of the biggest risks employers face regarding social media is: not properly training employees about social media policy. Over 37% of employers who responded to the survey proudly declare they have an air-tight social media in the workplace policy, but they fail to train employees about that policy. Making the additional investment of training can greatly reduce employee misuse of social media and can cut down the business’s need to impose discipline on employees.

The other greatest risk to employers focuses on former employees. A paltry 17.5% of businesses have provisions protecting against misuse of social media by former employees. These employers recognize that a person’s use of social media does not cease just because he or she changes jobs.

In my post for Maximize Social Business, I examine more results from this world-wide survey of businesses and offer some best practices for employers to follow.